Tips for Using Drones to Take Photos

Having a drone can be a lot of fun, so it’s becoming more and more popular. One of the cool things you can do with a drone is take pictures from above, which can mean some really great shots as long as you know what you’re doing. A few tips will help with this.

Don’t Fly Into the Sun

When taking pictures with camera drones, it’s best to avoid flying directly toward the sun. This can cause a number of problems. Typically, the camera overcorrects from the extra light, leaving the pictures looking washed out. Also, flying into the sun can make it so the shadow of the propellers ends up getting into the shot, potentially ruining it unless you wanted this shadow for some reason.

Play With Settings

Check out both the auto and the manual mode, as often you can get a better picture with the manual mode, but looking at what the camera thinks is the best shot can give you a better idea of what you’re aiming for. It’s also a good idea to use the RAW format when shooting pictures with a drone, as this gives more freedom in the editing process.

Consider Filters

It can be helpful for getting pictures if you use filters. For example, a neutral density filter can make the sky darker in photos, while a polarizing filter can make it so there’s less glare and the colors are more saturated in the photos. These work best when there’s plenty of light, however, and can make a picture too dark if it’s a low light situation.

Limit Shaking

The more windy it is, the more the drone will shake. Typically, the higher it flies, the windier it gets, and thus the more shaking there is. Keep the shutter speed at less than three seconds when possible to make it so the shaking of the drone isn’t as likely to interfere with your shots.

Take Multiple Shots

Don’t try to get the picture with just one shot. Take multiple shots in quick succession to give yourself more to work with. This is called bracketing and typically involves taking at least two pictures in a row, each with a slightly different setting on the camera.